Jante Law

From Wikipedia: “The Jante Law (Danish and Norwegian: Janteloven; Swedish: Jantelagen; Finnish: Janten laki; Faroese: Jantulógin) is a concept created by the Norwegian/Danish author Aksel Sandemose in his novel A refugee crosses his tracks (En flygtning krydser sit spor, 1933), where he portrays the small Danish town Jante, modelled upon his native town Nykøbing Mors as it was in the beginning of the 20th century, but typical of all very small towns, where nobody is anonymous.”

The poet Aksel Sandemose put Jante Law into words and they convey an important element of Norwegian culture: humility.

 Jante’s Law teaches people to be modest and not ‘think big’.

It is demonstrated in most people’s refusal to criticize others. Norwegians try to see all people as being on equal footing. They do not flaunt their wealth or financial achievements and look askance at those who do.

 

The tenets of Jante Law are:

1.       You shall not think you are special.

2.       You shall not believe you are smarter than others.

3.       You shall not believe you are wiser than others.

4.       You shall not behave as if you are better than others.

5.       You shall not believe that you know more than others.

6.       You shall not believe that you can fix things better than others.

7.       You shall not laugh at others.

8.       You shall not believe that others care about you.

9.       You shall not believe that you can teach others anything

 

http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/norway-country-profile.html

http://dthizy.livejournal.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jante_Law

 
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